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Convert mpc to mp3 on Linux

January 1, 2017 Leave a comment

You need the lame and mpcdec commands. On Debian, mpcdec is in the musepack-tools package:

sudo apt-get install lame musepack-tools

Then to convert all mpc files in the current directory to matchingly named mp3 files:

for x in *.mpc; do mpcdec "${x}" - | lame -r - "${x%.mpc}.mp3"; done
Categories: bash, coding, debian, linux, music

bash : Loop over lines in file with user prompt

December 8, 2016 Leave a comment

I used the following to loop over the lines in a file, while prompting the user for a key press on each iteration:

while read -u 3 line ; do 
  #clear the screen
  printf "\033c" 
  echo "$line"; echo

  # do something with the $line here

  read -n 1 -s -p "[Press any key to continue]"
done 3< "some-file.txt"

The reading of the lines is done via file descriptor 3 to avoid interference with the reading of the user’s key presses.

Categories: bash, coding Tags: ,

Determine which Tomcat version is running

August 6, 2016 7 comments

Determine process id

First we determine the process id(s) of the running Tomcat instance(s).

We can grep the running process list for ‘catalina.home’:

pgrep -f 'catalina.home'

This might yield more than one pid.

Or we can search by port (8080 is the default, adjust if necessary). The following commands will likely require root privileges:

lsof -t -i :8080

Alternatively, for example if lsof is not installed:

fuser 8080/tcp

Or yet another way, using netstat (or its “ss” replacement):

netstat -nlp | grep 8080
ss -nlp | grep 8080

Determine catalina.home

For the process id(s) determined above, we look at process details:

ps -o pid,uid,cmd -p [pidlist] | cat

For each specified pid, this shows the uid (system user) and the full command line of the process.

Typically the command line will contain something like “-Dcatalina.home=[path]” and that path is the catalina.home system property of the Java process.

Alternatively – with Java 7 and later – we can use the JDK command “jcmd” to query the JVM process for its system properties:

sudo -u [uid] jcmd [pid] VM.system_properties \
   | grep '^catalina.home' \
   | cut -f2 -d'='

Determine version

Now we can finally determine which Tomcat version is installed under the catalina.home path:

[catalina.home]/bin/catalina.sh version \
   | grep '^Server number:'

Note: Please replace [catalina.home] with the path you determined above.

The final output should be something like this:

Server number: 7.0.56.0

My favorite Free/Open Source Intellij Community plugins

July 28, 2016 Leave a comment

Retrieve “last modified” timestamp of web resource in UTC seconds

June 2, 2016 Leave a comment

This command line assumes that “${url}” is the URL of the web resource:

curl -s -I "${url}" | grep 'Last-Modified:' | cut -c 16- | date -f - +'%s'

It can be useful to check the freshness of a download URL before a GET request.

You could compare the result to the last-modified timestamp of a local file and only download the remote file if it is newer than the existing local one.

Categories: bash, coding Tags: , ,

Compare two Tomcat installations using rsync

Lets assume you manage multiple servers that host Java web applications using the Tomcat web server.

To quickly compare the Tomcat installations on host1 and host2, we can use the “dry-run” mode of the rsync command.

In the following example, we assume that you have ssh access to both of your Tomcat hosts, the installations are in /opt/tomcat and the “tomcat” system user has read access to all relevant files and directories of the installation:

ssh tomcat@host1
rsync --archive --checksum --dry-run --verbose --delete \
      --exclude temp --exclude work --exclude logs --exclude webapps \
      /opt/tomcat/ tomcat@host2:/opt/tomcat/

This will list

  • All files that differ in checksum
  • All files that only exist on host2 (look for ‘deleting [filename]’)

Run the same commands with host1 and host2 switched, to also see the files that only exist on host1.

We excluded the temp, work and logs directories because they are variable in nature.
We also excluded the webapps directory because we only wanted to compare the base installation.

Categories: bash, coding, cygwin, debian, linux, mac os

Spotify on Debian GNU/Linux in Canada

March 29, 2016 Leave a comment

Today I decided to try out the free ad-sponsored Spotify music streaming service. It has been available in Canada since September 2014.

After signing up you can immediately use the flash-based web player at play.spotify.com.

Installing the client app

Alternatively you can download and install the Spotify client app. I cannot say yet what the advantages or disadvantages are, maybe reading this article can be helpful.

Anyway, if you want to try the client app, for Debian (or Ubuntu) users it works like this:

  1. Add the repo key (to verify downloaded packages)
  2. Add the spotify repo to apt sources
  3. Update apt caches
  4. Install the spotify client

Here are the shell commands (requires sudo):

sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys BBEBDCB318AD50EC6865090613B00F1FD2C19886
echo deb http://repository.spotify.com stable non-free | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/spotify.list
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install spotify-client

After successful installation you will find a “Spotify” entry in the “Multimedia” section of your start menu.

Using your Facebook login

If you use your Facebook account to sign into Spotify you will probably see this question:

Spotify would like to post to Facebook for you.
Who do you want to share these posts with?

It is safe to choose “Not Now” which prevents Spotify from posting to your timeline. The login will still work.

If your are using the downloaded stand-alone client app and the Facebook login fails with an error page, then simply enter the email address and password from your Facebook account into the login fields of the Spotify client app.

Spotify says that it only uses these credentials to pass through to the Facebook authentication and won’t store your password anywhere. I hope that’s true.

Categories: bash, debian, linux, music Tags: